5 Delicious Recipes Made with Ingredients that Last 100 Years

Imagine some 2000 years ago a Pharaoh was buried in the great pyramids and adorned in gold and riches. Radical wealth disparity in that ancient Egypt, huh?

Not only did the great pharaohs spend eternity under a blanket of gold and jewels, they were also entombed with all kinds of trinkets and even foods! In fact, Archeologists have found honey in these tombs that is easily 2000 years old. The oldest sample has been dated at 3000 years old!

An ingredient like honey basically lasts forever! Of course, it’s not the only ingredient that will last for a very long time. As preppers we see the value in ingredients that have a long shelf life.

If food can sit on your shelves for a lifetime than that means you have food for any and all circumstances. For preppers and those seeking a lifetime of self-reliance and independence, FOOD is going to be the single most important commodity in your life in the 21st century.

During a SHTF situation, pain could become an annoyance for some, but unbearable for others.

If doctors are scarce and medicine becomes even scarcer, this one little weed, found all over North America and similar to morphine, could be a saving grace.

Best by Confusion

Most people believe that the date on the can of food or the package of food at the supermarket is religion. They believe that food past that date is trash.

These best by dates are part of a very interesting misunderstanding that few people clarify. The industry has used this confusion to sell more food!

If people knew the intent of the best by date, rather than the perceived notion, they would buy less food and hold onto what is in their pantry for much longer.

Best by is a quality date. When a food item is produced in a batch, the company is putting its name and reputation out on the market with that product. That food item will not taste the same way forever. There will come a time when a can of soup starts to taste different because of the time in the can. A packaged baked good will taste different after a length of time passes.

Once the taste is compromised, it is no longer representative of that brand and its reputation. It is no longer at its BEST.

Of course, it can be eaten for a long time past that date. Keep that in mind.

Here are 5 delicious recipes with ingredients that last 100 years:

#1. Rice and Bean Soup

5 Delicious Recipes Made with Ingredients that Last 100 Years

The ingredients you will need are:

  • 1 Cup of Red Beans
  • ¼ Cup of Rice
  • 6 Cups of water
  • 1 Tsp of Chili Powder, Garlic Powder and Turmeric, each
  • 1 Bouillon Cube.

The first thing to do is soak your beans in warm water overnight.

The next day, start by cooking your beans in 6 cups of water and simmer them for about 4 hours or until they are soft. Do not add salt until your beans are soft, or it could prevent them from ever getting tender.

Once the beans have gotten tender, you will add your bouillon cube and spices. Next add your rice and simmer the soup until your rice has cooked through. At this point you can adjust seasoning to your preference with salt and pepper.

Here are 23 survival uses for honey that you didn’t knowabout.

#2. Smoked Fish and Dried Potato Cakes

5 Delicious Recipes Made with Ingredients that Last 100 Years

For this second recipe you will need:

  • 1 Cup of Smoked White Fish
  • 2 Cups of Dried Potato Flakes, Dices or Powder
  • ¼ Cup of Flour
  • ¼ Cup of water
  • 1 Egg.

Mix all your ingredients together in a bowl. Form them into patties. Fry on both sides in a cast iron skill with oil. Once they are crispy on both sides, they are ready. Drain excess oil and eat.

#3. Red Wheat Berry Cereal

5 Delicious Recipes Made with Ingredients that Last 100 Years

The ingredients needed are:

  • 2 Cups Hard Red Wheat
  • 7 Cups Water
  • 1 Cup of Oats
  • ¼ Cup of Powdered Milk
  • 1 Cup Cooked Wheat Berries
  • Salt to taste
  • Cinnamon.

First, cook the wheat berries for one hour in your 7 cups of water, and add salt to make them tender.

Next cook your cup of oats ’till almost done and add your powdered milk and wheat berries. Stir in some cinnamon to taste and you are ready to serve this breakfast up.

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#4. Ramen with Jerky and Egg

5 Delicious Recipes Made with Ingredients that Last 100 Years

The ingredients you’ll need are:

  • 4 Packs of Beef Ramen
  • 1 lb of Beef Jerky
  • Fresh or Frozen Soup Vegetables (corn, peas, potatoes)
  • Tbsp of Dashi Powder.

This is a super easy recipe. Make your Ramen by package directions. Add your soup vegetables, dashi and bring back to a simmer. Take it off the heat and stir in your jerky.

#5. Pemmican and Lentils

5 Delicious Recipes Made with Ingredients that Last 100 Years

This recipe calls for 6 ingredients only:

  • 1 Cup of Lentils
  • 1-2 lbs of Pemmican
  • 2 Cups of Water
  • 1 Beef Bouillon Cube
  • 1 Tbsp of Curry Powder
  • 1 Onion, Diced

Start your onion in a pan with a little bit of oil. Sauté the onion over low heat until it goes translucent. Add your lentils and cook them for a minute or so.

Add your water, curry powder and bouillon cube to the pan. Simmer your lentils until they are soft.

In a separate bowl add your pemmican. Drain your lentils and add them to the bowl. Toss the mix sparingly and serve.

These ingredients that last 100 years or more, should be found in every prepper’s pantry.  Which of these ingredients are in your pantry?

Preparedness Hacks: Once a nuke is heading your way, you might think that there isn’t much left to do, but you would be wrong!

Because we will show you America’s natural nuclear bunkers that are also EMP proof. When the sirens start wailing, all you need to do is pick the closest one to your home, where you can take cover before it hits.

6 Winter Tricks That Keep Livestock Water From Freezing

During winter, the cold can cause homesteaders numerous headaches, but one that can’t be overlooked is our livestock’s need for water. Ice forms easily on exposed water tanks, buckets freeze up and crack, and fields are often far from power sources and water pumps. But don’t despair. You don’t need to spend this winter hauling water and banging ice. There is a better way!

The Ice Problem

Winter time will see cows’ and horses’ water needs increase. Animals expend more energy combatting the cold and as a result, they eat more to stay warm. With increased food intake, their water needs go up.

“Studies by the University of Alberta and Saskatchewan discovered that a mature cow needs at least 10 gallons of water a day in the winter. When the only water source available was snow, both dairy cows and beef cattle consumed less and showed marked deterioration in body condition and output. Animals that consume only snow suffer from mineral deficiencies that cause spontaneous abortions, poor vitality and impactions” (Wayne and Jerry Cook – Countryside Magazine online). Horses experience similar issues when water intake is limited, “the most common threat being impaction colic” (South Dakota University Extension, January 2013).

Try these ideas:

1. The Simplest Methods

Group water troughs together. This can form a “heat island,” especially when livestock gather. Having a number of water troughs also allows weaker animals a chance to get water without having to fight their way to the trough. Experiment to determine how much water your animals are drinking. If you fill the troughs to the amount they drink, you will have less ice buildup as the animals drink all, or most, of the water before it has a chance to freeze. Just be sure that your livestock are not receiving too little water. If the tanks are bone dry when you go to fill them, put more water in. Use common sense and check often when you first start regulating water.

Another great farmer’s hack is to enclose the water tank partially in a well-insulated shed. This slows heat loss from the water. On really cold days you can run a small heater or lamp inside the shed and this should keep the water from freezing over. If you can’t build a shed, consider insulating your water tanks and covering much of the top of the trough. Just be sure that weaker animals are still getting a chance to drink.

If the above measures still aren’t enough to keep ice from forming, then you may want to consider several available systems. There are varying costs of money and time required, but you can select what will work best for your setup.

2. Automatic Watering Units

These units generally require larger numbers of animals to be using them to keep the water flowing and not freezing, although some units may have a continuous running water system set up. There are units with built-in heating components as well. Generally, watering units are best installed by a professional, but they work like a gem once in place.

3. Electric Tank Heaters and Deicers

Image source: Wikimedia

There are numerous heaters for most sizes of tanks. The downside is that they require a ready supply of electricity and will fail to work once power is lost. However, they keep water above freezing quite well. Submergible heaters are the best as the animals won’t bother them as much. Look for a unit that has a built-in thermostat so that it will shut off during warmer weather and spare you extra trips to the paddock or pasture. However, be sure to check that the unit is working during colder weather and that your animals haven’t accidentally removed it.

4. Heated Buckets

Heated buckets can work well for solo animals, but they generally need to be secured to something so they aren’t ripped from their electricity source. Buckets work especially well in run-in shelters and unheated barns.

5. Propane Stock Tank Heaters

When electrical sources are an issue, propane stock tank heaters can be an excellent option. Large portable units can be placed far from buildings and always run, even when power outages may affect the rest of your operation. Be sure to check, however, that the pilot light isn’t extinguished by strong wind. Also, check fuel levels periodically.

6. Water Circulators

Water circulators don’t use heat to keep ice from forming, but rather work the same way that a stream or creek does. Moving water doesn’t freeze as fast. Circulators generally run off of batteries and you have the option of hooking the batteries up to a solar power system to recharge them. Keep in mind, though, that circulators work best with automatically filled tanks, as the circulators need to be in contact with the water to keep working.

Keeping your livestock’s water supply at optimum levels during winter’s freezing temperatures can be intimidating, but with the options shared above, you can get started on changing this wintertime hassle to something that practically takes care of itself. Don’t be afraid to get creative if the options above don’t quite suit you.

Areas of the country often handle freezing temperatures differently and using creativity to employ the above solutions may solve your winter water problems. You just might become “that guy” who others turn to for country wisdom.

6 Winter Tricks That Keep Livestock Water From Freezing

During winter, the cold can cause homesteaders numerous headaches, but one that can’t be overlooked is our livestock’s need for water. Ice forms easily on exposed water tanks, buckets freeze up and crack, and fields are often far from power sources and water pumps. But don’t despair. You don’t need to spend this winter hauling water and banging ice. There is a better way!

The Ice Problem

Winter time will see cows’ and horses’ water needs increase. Animals expend more energy combatting the cold and as a result, they eat more to stay warm. With increased food intake, their water needs go up.

“Studies by the University of Alberta and Saskatchewan discovered that a mature cow needs at least 10 gallons of water a day in the winter. When the only water source available was snow, both dairy cows and beef cattle consumed less and showed marked deterioration in body condition and output. Animals that consume only snow suffer from mineral deficiencies that cause spontaneous abortions, poor vitality and impactions” (Wayne and Jerry Cook – Countryside Magazine online). Horses experience similar issues when water intake is limited, “the most common threat being impaction colic” (South Dakota University Extension, January 2013).

During a SHTF situation, pain could become an annoyance for some, but unbearable for others.

If doctors are scarce and medicine becomes even scarcer, this one little weed, found all over North America and similar to morphine, could be a saving grace.

Try these ideas:

1. The Simplest Methods

Group water troughs together. This can form a “heat island,” especially when livestock gather. Having a number of water troughs also allows weaker animals a chance to get water without having to fight their way to the trough. Experiment to determine how much water your animals are drinking. If you fill the troughs to the amount they drink, you will have less ice buildup as the animals drink all, or most, of the water before it has a chance to freeze. Just be sure that your livestock are not receiving too little water. If the tanks are bone dry when you go to fill them, put more water in. Use common sense and check often when you first start regulating water.

Another great farmer’s hack is to enclose the water tank partially in a well-insulated shed. This slows heat loss from the water. On really cold days you can run a small heater or lamp inside the shed and this should keep the water from freezing over. If you can’t build a shed, consider insulating your water tanks and covering much of the top of the trough. Just be sure that weaker animals are still getting a chance to drink.

If the above measures still aren’t enough to keep ice from forming, then you may want to consider several available systems. There are varying costs of money and time required, but you can select what will work best for your setup.

2. Automatic Watering Units

These units generally require larger numbers of animals to be using them to keep the water flowing and not freezing, although some units may have a continuous running water system set up. There are units with built-in heating components as well. Generally, watering units are best installed by a professional, but they work like a gem once in place.

Here are 23 survival uses for honey that you didn’t knowabout.

3. Electric Tank Heaters and Deicers

Image source: Wikimedia

There are numerous heaters for most sizes of tanks. The downside is that they require a ready supply of electricity and will fail to work once power is lost. However, they keep water above freezing quite well. Submergible heaters are the best as the animals won’t bother them as much. Look for a unit that has a built-in thermostat so that it will shut off during warmer weather and spare you extra trips to the paddock or pasture. However, be sure to check that the unit is working during colder weather and that your animals haven’t accidentally removed it.

4. Heated Buckets

Heated buckets can work well for solo animals, but they generally need to be secured to something so they aren’t ripped from their electricity source. Buckets work especially well in run-in shelters and unheated barns.

5. Propane Stock Tank Heaters

When electrical sources are an issue, propane stock tank heaters can be an excellent option. Large portable units can be placed far from buildings and always run, even when power outages may affect the rest of your operation. Be sure to check, however, that the pilot light isn’t extinguished by strong wind. Also, check fuel levels periodically.

6. Water Circulators

Water circulators don’t use heat to keep ice from forming, but rather work the same way that a stream or creek does. Moving water doesn’t freeze as fast. Circulators generally run off of batteries and you have the option of hooking the batteries up to a solar power system to recharge them. Keep in mind, though, that circulators work best with automatically filled tanks, as the circulators need to be in contact with the water to keep working.

Keeping your livestock’s water supply at optimum levels during winter’s freezing temperatures can be intimidating, but with the options shared above, you can get started on changing this wintertime hassle to something that practically takes care of itself. Don’t be afraid to get creative if the options above don’t quite suit you.

New Survival Energy Product Makes Every Window A Powerful Solar Charger

Areas of the country often handle freezing temperatures differently and using creativity to employ the above solutions may solve your winter water problems. You just might become “that guy” who others turn to for country wisdom.

Preparedness Hacks: Once a nuke is heading your way, you might think that there isn’t much left to do, but you would be wrong!

Because we will show you America’s natural nuclear bunkers that are also EMP proof. When the sirens start wailing, all you need to do is pick the closest one to your home, where you can take cover before it hits.

40 Bizarre Home Remedies Our Grandparents Taught Us That Actually Work

These days, it has become all too common for people to reach for a pill bottle or call the doctor anytime something goes wrong, or even for the smallest scrape. The simple, wacky home remedies of our grandparents, those weird concoctions formed from everyday household goods, are often mocked by today’s medical establishment. But surprisingly, the truth is that our grandparents actually knew a lot more about the world than we give them credit for, and many of these old-fashioned folk remedies actually work. Not just that, but many of them work better than the synthetic pharmaceuticals that so many people stuff their bodies with today.

Preparedness Hacks: Once a nuke is heading your way, you might think that there isn’t much left to do, but you would be wrong!

Because we will show you America’s natural nuclear bunkers that are also EMP proof. When the sirens start wailing, all you need to do is pick the closest one to your home, where you can take cover before it hits.

Here are 40 weird, wacky, but shockingly effective home remedies that still work today, and would make grandma proud.

1. Use Garlic and Olive Oil for Athlete’s Foot

Everyone knows about the many health benefits of garlic, but did you know that it can fix your athlete’s foot problem in a jiffy? Just mince some garlic cloves, mix them with natural olive oil, and then use bit of cotton to rub this mixture onto the affected area between the toes.

2. Potato Slices for Headaches

Headaches and/or migraines can ruin even the best day, but there is a weird natural solution that works: potato slices. Just cut a few slices from a raw potato, soak them in a very thin cloth, and apply them to your forehead or directly to the temples.

3. Ease Cuticle Infections with Vinegar

Done too much manicuring? Cuticles all torn up and infected? Make a glass of vinegar and warm water, then put your fingers in it for about 15 minutes. Repeat this procedure once a day or so until the infection fades away.

4. Use Vinegar to Cure Swimmer’s Ear

There’s nothing that ruins a good day at the beach like coming home with swimmer’s ear. But when your grandparents told you to drop some vinegar in your ears, they weren’t kidding. The acidic properties of vinegar can kill off that awful swimmer’s ear bacteria, leaving you feeling like yourself again. Just take out some white vinegar, dilute it with distilled water, and put three drops into the problematic ear, three times a day, until the problem fades.

5. Olive Oil for Eczema

Feeling itchy already? Eczema can make anyone grow crazy. But olive oil, which is full of antioxidants and often used as an ingredient in professional skin creams, isn’t just good for athlete’s foot: it can ease the symptoms of eczema as well. Simply rub some olive oil onto the eczema-affected areas of your skin, and it should help quite a bit. Here are 23 survival uses for honey that you didn’t knowabout.

6. Fix Hiccups with a Spoonful of Sugar

Yes, seriously. The legends are true. Don’t get too overzealous with it, because diabetes isn’t something to mess around with, but this old-fashioned trick will halt the hiccups in their tracks. The reason why is because the behavior we call “hiccups” are actually just spasms of your diaphragm, so having a spoon of dry sugar will throw off the nerve muscles and cure their agitation.

7. Get rid of warts with duct tape

It sounds crazy, but it works. Instead of going to all the work to get your warts frozen off, just covered them with duct tape. After cleaning a wart off, just apply a strip of the tape to the affected area, and then keep it there for three days. After that, remove, rub the wart area with a pumice stone, and then apply new tape.  Continue this process every three days until the wart goes the way of the dinosaurs.

8. Treat Acne with Coconut Oil

Coconut oil might seem like the cool new kid on the block, but it’s actually an old-timer that’s been around since the 1800s. In addition to many other uses, coconut oil is an effective treatment for acne, since its antibiotic properties prevent further breakouts. Just apply coconut oil to the skin, maybe mixing it with a little raw honey.

9. Have a Little Yogurt for That Bad Breath

Bad breath, officially known as halitosis, is a terrible thing to live with. But the cure for it is right there in your fridge: yogurt. At least two servings a day of this probiotic wonder, ideally a plain brand with no sugar, changes the landscape of your tongue so that it won’t breed any more the bad bacteria that produces that distinctive stink.

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10. Deal with bug bites by using toothpaste

Well, not technically the toothpaste itself, but rather, the peppermint oil inside the toothpaste: if you have the pure peppermint oil itself, that’s even more effective. Either way, applying peppermint oil to a bug bite—even if it’s just through dabbing on a little toothpaste – will immediately reduce the raw itchiness we all know too well.

11. Use Licorice to Eliminate Corns

Yes, licorice, everyone’s least favorite candy. But the one thing worse than licorice is having a corn on your toe. If you soak some licorice with oil, apply it all to the affected area, then wrap it tight under plastic wrap (and maybe a sock) for 6-8 hours—for instance, overnight—this will cause the licorice to soften the corn.

12. Ease Your Hangover with Apple Cider Vinegar

Drinking might be fun, but hangovers aren’t fun for anyone. But when you used to see grandpa downing a shot of apple cider vinegar after a night with his buddies, he knew what he was doing. Apple cider vinegar balances the pH levels in your stomach after a little too much alcohol throws it off. Just gulp down a teaspoon of this vinegar, or a small shot-glass. If you can’t take it straight, dilute it with some water. 

During a SHTF situation, pain could become an annoyance for some, but unbearable for others.

If doctors are scarce and medicine becomes even scarcer, this one little weed, found all over North America and similar to morphine, could be a saving grace.

13. Constipation with beets

The human body needs to eliminate waste, and when it gets all bunched up, major discomfort ensues. One home solution you may have heard from your grandparents was to eat some fresh-steamed beets, then drink the water they were steamed in. This should clear out your colon like magic. Just be warned that when you do go, your stools or urine may be bright red: nothing to worry about, just the natural dye of the beets.

14. Vodka for stinky feet

Having trouble with foot odor? Get some vodka. No, we’re not suggesting that you get drunk and avoid the problem. The key is that alcoholic is an antiseptic, which means it eliminates the fungus that causes foot odor, and dries your feet out. Just soak a thin cloth in some vodka, swipe your foot down, and feel the smell go away.

15. Mix Cumin, Honey, Cinnamon and Ginger for Diarrhea

A bad case of the runs can keep you up all night. Instead of taking drugs that will simply constipate you, thereby causing more stomach pains, a better natural remedy is to combine a teaspoon of cumin, and the same portion of honey, cinnamon, and ginger into a paste that you can drink.

16. Lemons for an Earache

Pain in the ears can be soothed by the application of freshly-squeezed lemons. Just squeeze a lemon onto a Q-tip, and delicately rub this just inside the ear to restore pH balance.

17. Stinging Nettle for Hair Loss

You can’t force hair to regrow once it’s already gone, but you can slow down the rate of hair loss through the use of stinging nettle, an herb often used for tea. Drinking stinging nettle tea a few times a day should help, and you can also massage stinging nettle itself in your scalp.

18. Cure Nausea with Olives

Whether it’s from motion sickness or an unpleasant sight, the familiar (but unpleasant) side effects associated with nausea can be cured by eating olives, due to the tannin inside them.

19. Potatoes for Spider Bites

If a spider managed to sink its teeth into you, ease the itching and swelling by shredding a potato, wrapping the pieces in cloth, and applying to the bite area. Note, this is a treatment for symptoms of a regular, non-deadly bite: if the bite comes from a more deadly spider, such as a black widow, seek immediate medical attention.

20. Raw Honey for Chapped Lips

Don’t ever waste your money on Chapstick again. Much has been said about the healing properties of raw, organic honey, but if your lips are chapped, you can simply apply honey to the affected area—rub it on, just as you would Chapstick—and it will do the job nicely, and taste better to boot. Just make sure the honey is both raw and organic.

21. Garlic for Allergies

For a more natural antihistamine when your nasal allergies act up, eat lots of garlic, whether it’s straight bulbs or slices on crackers. Garlic contains a lot of the antioxidant quercetin, which eases allergy symptoms. If there’s no garlic in the pantry, onions work as well.

22. Buttermilk and Ginger for Diarrhea

If you don’t have cumin on hand, another weird-but-effective home remedy for diarrhea is to mix half of a teaspoon of dry ginger into a cup of buttermilk, and drink it.

23. Treat Styes with Potatoes

If you haven’t noticed, potatoes are a lot more powerful than people realize. If you get a stye on your eye, just grate a potato, wrap the gratings in a cloth, and press to the affected area to ease inflammation.

24. Avoid Mosquitoes with Garlic

If you don’t want to get eaten alive with mosquitoes, enjoy a garlic-rich diet, because mosquitoes are totally repelled by garlic. For further protection, rub garlic oil on your skin.

25. Yams for Menopause

To up your dosage of vitamin A, lower your cholesterol, and add more antioxidants to your diet, start incorporating yams—real yams, not sweet potatoes—into your regular daily diet.

26. Apples Help the Bowels

Apples are high in pectin, a naturally occurring fiber that both bulks up and softens stools. This means that apples are an effective treatment for both diarrhea andconstipation. Just make sure to eat the skin too, which contains valuable ursolic acid.

27. Banana Peel for Poison Ivy

While bananas won’t prevent you from getting the allergic rash that 85% of the population contracts from touching poison ivy, they can help. Rub the inside of a banana peel against poison ivy rash for relief from the pain and itchiness.

28. Honey for Acid Reflux

As soon as the symptoms of acid reflux begin affecting you, swallow three spoons of honey, and it should help you achieve better digestion.

29. Blackstrap molasses for Constipation

If you suffer from frequent constipation, try injecting a little blackstrap molasses into your diet, whether as a coffee additive or an extra ingredient in cookies. This molasses should ease constipation, but be careful not to over-indulge, because too much molasses will increase constipation.

30. Pine Syrup for Sore Throats

You know what helps a sore throat? Pine needles. Yes, really. To make pine syrup, collect a cup of freshly-washed pine needles, and thoroughly blend them. Meanwhile, boil water, corn syrup, and a bit of salt, mix this with the needles, then steep for a few hours. Keep this syrup in the refrigerator for at least a month, then keep it on hand forever to treat sore throats.

31. DIY Cough Syrup

If you want to make a good cough syrup from the ingredients of your pantry, mix together ¼ teaspoon ground ginger, 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar, ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper, 1 tablespoon of honey, and a few spoons of water. Mix it all together, and have 1-3 teaspoons to ease coughing symptoms.

32. Garlic for toothache

Nothing will keep you up at night like a bad cavity or an exposed nerve. While garlic won’t cure the underlying issue, chewing on garlic at night, particularly chewing whole cloves in the affected area, will ease pain tremendously.

33. Put on Wet Socks to Treat a Cold

Hear us out for a minute. To treat the symptoms of a common cold, begin by soaking your feet in hot water for at least three minutes – or just taking a bath. Meanwhile, soak a pair of your socks in ice water. Put the socks on your feet, cover them up with a pair of wool socks, and then go to bed. As you sleep with these horribly cold feet, the blood vessels will constrict, pushing nutrients up into your body to push out the infection.

34. Fix Dry Skin

To soften dry skin, break down two bananas and mix them with a bit of honey. Apply this paste to the skin, let it sit for about 20 minutes, and then wash it off, and your skin should feel softer.

35. Teabags for Burns

Get a cool-temperature, wet teabag, of any tea, and place it directly on the burned area. This won’t fix the burn, but it will relieve the pain almost immediately.

36. Oil Pulling

This might have become a trend recently, but it’s actually an old practice that our grandparents learned from their grandparents. Basically, enhance your dental routine by taking a spoonful of coconut oil – though other oils work as well – and swishing it in your mouth for five minutes a day, specifically pulling it through the teeth, and then spit it out into the toilet. The oil will “pull” all of the toxins out of the mouth, allowing you to spit them out in one go. When used in addition to standard brushing and flossing, oil pulling will help digestion, reduce gingivitis, prevent receding gums, get rid of bad breath, strengthen teeth, and much, much more.

37. Help Eczema with an Oatmeal Bath

If the horrendous itchiness of eczema still has you down, you can hugely reduce the itchiness by following your grandmother’s old advice taking a bath of oatmeal. There’s a reason that so many lotions and pharmaceutical eczema treatments contain oatmeal as an ingredient: it really works! For a home solution, just make a bath for yourself, fill it with colloidal oatmeal, and then soak for a while.

38. Stop Your Snoring

Is your snoring annoying your wife or husband? Try drinking a glass of warm milk with a teaspoon of turmeric powder added to it before bed, and hear your partner’s relief.

39. Basil Leaves and Ginger for Fever

Fevers are the body’s way of pushing out an infection, but when it’s time to cut back on the heat, here’s a home solution. Crush some ginger and basil leaves together into  paste, then add a teaspoon of honey. Squeeze out the liquid, and then take a drink ever four hours or so.

40. Soak Golden Raisins in Gin for Arthritis

If there’s one thing that afflicted so many of our grandparents, it was the terrible swelling pains of arthritis. But they had a home remedy that still works today. Get some golden raisins, soak them in gin, and let it sit overnight until all of the gin has been soaked up. After this is done, eat about ten raisins a day. While this won’t fix the underlying problems of arthritis, it will greatly ease the symptoms.

The Four States In America To Live Off The Grid

I grew up in upstate New York. The beautiful rolling hills, the Great Lakes. The lovely farm country. I would never go back if you paid me millions of dollars. Never.

But for the better part of a decade I have resided well south of the Mason-Dixon line. In fact, when I spoke to a relative a short time ago from New York State, they were shocked I didn’t sound like a Yankee, or even speak like one. “You’ve gone native,” they told me. Which is well and good in my book.

New York is about as liberal/progressive of a state as you can get. It’s a state that does not honor life, the sanctity of marriage or gun rights. It taxes its residents to death, does not value homeschoolers and has no more respect for Almighty God than does Richard Dawkins. Since I have left, the New York government has only worsened.

During a SHTF situation, pain could become an annoyance for some, but unbearable for others.

If doctors are scarce and medicine becomes even scarcer, this one little weed, found all over North America and similar to morphine, could be a saving grace.

For many of us who homestead and farm on a small scale, we also raise families, own firearms, go to church and desire a quiet life lived in peace. Sadly judging by the moral and political climate in some places in North America, we often have to leave the place we call home in order to find these things. I believe there are still good places out there to put down roots and farm and raise your children, while other places in the USA have gone quite authoritarian.

(Here are 21 wild edibles you can find in urban areas.)

Here are three areas in the United States for those seeking fair land prices, less government involvement, a religious friendly atmosphere, low taxes, and a place friendly toward gun owners.

South

The land of cotton has changed much in the past half century, but the area is well-known as a bastion of conservative and Christian values in the USA. The land is good for agriculture and there are many homesteaders and small-time farmers who have flocked to this region over the past two to three decades from all over the USA and Canada.

My pick for the southeast:

The Best States In America To Live Off The Grid

Tennessee. The state’s motto of “Agriculture and Commerce” speaks of the beautiful and lush farmlands — and low taxes. There is no state income tax in Tennessee. Gun freedoms are very good, and in fact after a recent shooting, Tennessee’s lieutenant governor urged people to go and get their handgun carry permits. No such thing as an “assault weapons ban” or magazine restrictions exist in the Volunteer State. Land prices are expensive toward the Blue Ridge Mountains, but Middle and West Tennessee land prices are affordable. Homeschooling conditions are great for families.

Experts predict that an EMP strike that wipes out electricity across the nation would ultimately lead to the demise of up to 90% of the population. However, this figure begs an important question: if we were able to live thousands of years without even the concept of electricity, why would we suddenly all die without it?

Southwest

Texas. Don’t mess with the Lone Star State. A conservative government, coupled with excellent gun laws, makes Texas one of the top places to live for the small farmer or homesteader. While not as fertile as some states, ranching is big business in Texas. A farm on the Edwards Plateau will provide your family with water from the aquifer with the same name. In the more fertile east, row crop farming as well as vegetable growing does reasonably well. (Here are 23 survival uses for honey that you didn’t know about.)

With the end of the recent drought, Texas received more rainwater this year than it had in seven years. Beware of buying land near the Mexican-US border and stay away from the more progressive cities like Austin or Dallas. Most Texans value liberty and independence, a great thing for the homesteader or farmer.

West

The Best States In America To Live Off The Grid

Idaho and Wyoming. Both of these states tie for the best places to live out west. Excellent gun laws, conservative government, a fierce independent spirit, and excellent farm country make these Rocky Mountain states ideal for the homesteader/farmer. Rich soil is available, and land prices are cheap. If you want to be away from people, this is the perfect place for you. You want to hunt and fish? This is the ideal location for the sportsman, with teeming populations of deer, elk, pronghorn and even bison. Idaho is the more temperate state, whereas Wyoming is known for its brutally cold winters.

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Northeast

New Hampshire. The last bastion of any freedom in the Northeast is the Granite State, but even this state is slipping slowly toward the liberalism that has transformed the Northeast. If you must live in the North, New Hampshire or perhaps the north woods of Maine are really the only two viable options I see

Preparedness Hacks: Once a nuke is heading your way, you might think that there isn’t much left to do, but you would be wrong!

Because we will show you America’s natural nuclear bunkers that are also EMP proof. When the sirens start wailing, all you need to do is pick the closest one to your home, where you can take cover before it hits.

The Best 7 States to Retire In

As the clock keeps ticking on, I find myself getting closer and closer to retirement age. While the issue of whether or not I ever will fully retire is something yet to be determined. But I’m pretty sure that I will at least slow down and not be working 40 plus hours per week.

Of course, me being me, I’ll never retire from being a survivalist. That’s too much a part of my being now, after 45 years, to give up on. So whatever form my retirement or semi-retirement takes, it’s going to look more like a permanent bug out, than anything else. A very high priority for me will be to go somewhere that I can establish as much of a sustainable, self-sufficient lifestyle as possible.

With that in mind, I’ve started looking around to see what’s available. I’m not talking about specific pieces of property or homes, but rather what parts of the country I would choose as a good place to live out the rest of my days in. I want a combination of comfort and security, hopefully with a reasonable cost of living.

With that in mind, I’ve come up with a few criteria:

  • It must not be an area subject to a lot of natural disasters. This cuts out some of the top retirement spots, like Florida, as well as much of the Eastern Seaboard.
  • I want an area with a fairly low population. If there is ever a TEOTWAWKI event, those who live in high population areas, especially big cities, will probably be the first to die.
  • Sufficient rainfall or access to ground water to be able to grow my own food.
  • Low overall cost of living, so that I don’t have to pay too much for property.
  • A conservative government. With the country becoming more and more divided politically and the progressive states becoming more and more extreme, I’d prefer to avoid having to deal with it.
  • While I don’t want to live in a high population area, I want to be close enough to one, that I can go into town to buy things I need. I don’t mind an hour drive into town on a Saturday, if that day is going to be dedicated to shopping.

Of course, all of those things are relative. Low population in the eastern part of the country is totally different than low population in the Midwest and West. Nevertheless, the idea is to find an area which meets those basic needs as much as possible. Here’s what I’ve come up with:

Idaho

The Best 7 States to Retire In

Idaho is actually one of the few states I’ve never visited; but I felt that I had to use it to start this list. In many ways, Idaho is one of the most perfect states for the criteria I have laid out.

The population of the state is fairly low, giving a low cost of living. Yet there is plenty of rainfall, making it an easy state to grow food in. However, I’d avoid the most southern part of the state, because it is drier there.

The one thing that Idaho has going against it is that it is so far north. The growing season in Idaho, as well as some of the other states I have on my list, is pretty short. That means growing in underground greenhouses, probably with geothermal heating to boot. Putting up with the cold will be a challenge; but fortunately I like the cold.

Northwest Wyoming

The Best 7 States to Retire In

I’ve spent a fair amount of time in Wyoming, although I’ve never lived there. More than anything, it’s a ranching state, raising cattle for beef.

As with many other ranching states, like Texas, there really isn’t enough rainfall for growing crops in much of Wyoming.

However, the Northwest part of the state has good rainfall, so it would be good for raising food in. The population is still low there and the cost of living is reasonable.

There is a drawback to this part of the state. That is, this is where Yellowstone National Park is. In other words, the Yellowstone Supervolcano. So if you’re worried about that volcano erupting, you may want to consider somewhere else.

North & South Dakota

The Best 7 States to Retire In

The Dakotas, as they are known, are sparsely populated states, which are mostly agricultural, with some ranching thrown in.

There’s more rainfall in the eastern part of the states, but there are more rivers in the western part. So it seems that whatever part of the Dakotas I would retire in would have good water sources to meet my needs.

These states are pretty conservative, with a fairly low cost of living. But just like Idaho, they are far to the north, so we’re talking short growing seasons and cold winters. While those can be dealt with, it will be hard to live there without proper preparation.

Southeast Texas

The Best 7 States to Retire In

I currently live in Southeast Texas, so I know this area the best of any of them. While I’m looking at other places to retire, I may just end up staying where I am; or at least staying in this area.

Once you get out of the bigger cities, the population is reasonable. Cost of living outside the cities is good too. In fact, the Rio Grande River, where I used to live, is one of the cheapest places to live in the country.

Being so far south, Texas has little problem with winter. There has only been one Christmas snowfall in history, in the Rio Grande Valley. The trick here is growing things. You can grow year-round, but have to be careful about the hot summers. I’ve lost more than one plant to nothing more than heat.

Water can be a real issue in much of Texas. I won’t even consider the western part of the state for that reason. There’s lots of cheap land out there, but almost no water to speak of. On the other hand, the gulf coast of Texas has a number of small rivers leading into it. The trick then, is finding a piece of property which allows access to those rivers, either on the surface or through a well. Rainfall alone isn’t enough to count on.

Arkansas

The Best 7 States to Retire In

For some reason, people make a lot of fun of Arkansas, but the state has a lot going for it. Most of the state is hilly, with plenty of rivers and good rainfall.

It’s also one of the cheaper places in the country to live. For anyone on a retirement income, that’s an important consideration.

Another nice thing about Arkansas is the climate. It’s not so far south that heat is going to be a major issue, but yet is far enough south to avoid the harsh winters of the north. Although the overall population density of the state is higher than anything we’ve looked at so far, there are still plenty of places with tiny towns and sparse populations.

Tennessee

The Best 7 States to Retire In

Tennessee probably has the highest population density overall of any state that I’ve mentioned here in this list. However, that population is mostly limited to the major cities.

It is a mountainous state, with the mountains being sparsely populated. There are many places you can go, where you can still find wide-open land. Cost of living varies throughout the state, so you’ll have to be selective.

As a growing state, Tennessee is a mixed blessing. One of the things that stands out is that the state is extremely green. That’s because of the high rainfall. But remember, that rain is falling on mountainous terrain, which is difficult to farm. But then, we’re not talking about actual farming, but rather growing our own food. So with that in mind, Tennessee is a winner.

Colorado Rockies

The Best 7 States to Retire In

I grew up in Colorado and spent much time in the Rockies. That probably has a lot to do with why I’ve included it in this list. If I could pick one place where I’d like to retire, it would be up in those mountains.

There’s just one problem with that; Colorado is the most expensive place I’ve picked on this list. Mountain property is expensive, even if though is sparsely populated.

Colorado may not be a good place for growing food… at least not in the mountains. The eastern part of the state is all farmlands. But it’s a great place for hunting; as are pretty much all the other states I’ve mentioned here. So, even if it isn’t perfect, the state has a lot going for it.

So, Where Would I Pick?

I’ll have to admit, the jury is still out on my own decision. As of this time, my top picks are either to stay here in Texas or move to Arkansas. I’d like to move up north to the Dakotas, or even to Idaho, but the cold weather has me concerned. While I can handle the cold well, my wife can’t.

The other problem with that cold weather is growing enough food. I wrote recently about a retired man who is growing citrus in Nebraska, using underground greenhouses and geothermal heating. That’s what it would take to grow enough food to live. While I’m sure I could do it, I’m not sure I’ve got enough money to invest in building those greenhouse and getting them running.

Part of my decision is also one of proximity. If I buy some property now and start preparing for my retirement, that property can also be my bug out retreat. I’ve got my eye on a couple of small towns here in Texas, which I think would be very nice to retire in. They meet all my criteria, are close enough to be good for bugging out to, while still being far enough away that I won’t have to worry about them being affected by anything that hits my home city.

The Four States In America To Live Off The Grid

I grew up in upstate New York. The beautiful rolling hills, the Great Lakes. The lovely farm country. I would never go back if you paid me millions of dollars. Never.

But for the better part of a decade I have resided well south of the Mason-Dixon line. In fact, when I spoke to a relative a short time ago from New York State, they were shocked I didn’t sound like a Yankee, or even speak like one. “You’ve gone native,” they told me. Which is well and good in my book.

New York is about as liberal/progressive of a state as you can get. It’s a state that does not honor life, the sanctity of marriage or gun rights. It taxes its residents to death, does not value homeschoolers and has no more respect for Almighty God than does Richard Dawkins. Since I have left, the New York government has only worsened.

During a SHTF situation, pain could become an annoyance for some, but unbearable for others.

If doctors are scarce and medicine becomes even scarcer, this one little weed, found all over North America and similar to morphine, could be a saving grace.

For many of us who homestead and farm on a small scale, we also raise families, own firearms, go to church and desire a quiet life lived in peace. Sadly judging by the moral and political climate in some places in North America, we often have to leave the place we call home in order to find these things. I believe there are still good places out there to put down roots and farm and raise your children, while other places in the USA have gone quite authoritarian.

(Here are 21 wild edibles you can find in urban areas.)

Here are three areas in the United States for those seeking fair land prices, less government involvement, a religious friendly atmosphere, low taxes, and a place friendly toward gun owners.

South

The land of cotton has changed much in the past half century, but the area is well-known as a bastion of conservative and Christian values in the USA. The land is good for agriculture and there are many homesteaders and small-time farmers who have flocked to this region over the past two to three decades from all over the USA and Canada.

My pick for the southeast:

The Best States In America To Live Off The Grid

Tennessee. The state’s motto of “Agriculture and Commerce” speaks of the beautiful and lush farmlands — and low taxes. There is no state income tax in Tennessee. Gun freedoms are very good, and in fact after a recent shooting, Tennessee’s lieutenant governor urged people to go and get their handgun carry permits. No such thing as an “assault weapons ban” or magazine restrictions exist in the Volunteer State. Land prices are expensive toward the Blue Ridge Mountains, but Middle and West Tennessee land prices are affordable. Homeschooling conditions are great for families.

Experts predict that an EMP strike that wipes out electricity across the nation would ultimately lead to the demise of up to 90% of the population. However, this figure begs an important question: if we were able to live thousands of years without even the concept of electricity, why would we suddenly all die without it?

Southwest

Texas. Don’t mess with the Lone Star State. A conservative government, coupled with excellent gun laws, makes Texas one of the top places to live for the small farmer or homesteader. While not as fertile as some states, ranching is big business in Texas. A farm on the Edwards Plateau will provide your family with water from the aquifer with the same name. In the more fertile east, row crop farming as well as vegetable growing does reasonably well. (Here are 23 survival uses for honey that you didn’t know about.)

With the end of the recent drought, Texas received more rainwater this year than it had in seven years. Beware of buying land near the Mexican-US border and stay away from the more progressive cities like Austin or Dallas. Most Texans value liberty and independence, a great thing for the homesteader or farmer.

West

The Best States In America To Live Off The Grid

Idaho and Wyoming. Both of these states tie for the best places to live out west. Excellent gun laws, conservative government, a fierce independent spirit, and excellent farm country make these Rocky Mountain states ideal for the homesteader/farmer. Rich soil is available, and land prices are cheap. If you want to be away from people, this is the perfect place for you. You want to hunt and fish? This is the ideal location for the sportsman, with teeming populations of deer, elk, pronghorn and even bison. Idaho is the more temperate state, whereas Wyoming is known for its brutally cold winters.

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Northeast

New Hampshire. The last bastion of any freedom in the Northeast is the Granite State, but even this state is slipping slowly toward the liberalism that has transformed the Northeast. If you must live in the North, New Hampshire or perhaps the north woods of Maine are really the only two viable options I see

Preparedness Hacks: Once a nuke is heading your way, you might think that there isn’t much left to do, but you would be wrong!

Because we will show you America’s natural nuclear bunkers that are also EMP proof. When the sirens start wailing, all you need to do is pick the closest one to your home, where you can take cover before it hits.

The Crazy Gardening Trick That Gives You 10 Times More Potatoes

Americans love potatoes, eating about 125 pounds, per person, per year. Although potatoes are easy to grow, many off-gridders on small plots of land avoid them because traditional growing techniques take up a lot of space. However, by using the caging technique, you can get a high yield in a small space.

Caging refers to the practice of using a wire cage, wooden box, barrel, or any other device designed to grow potatoes vertically. By using this practice, potato yield can be increased by anywhere from two to 10 times using the same area of garden.

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Here’s how caging works:

1. The container

Select the container, or cage, for your crop. It should be 18 inches by 18 inches or larger, with room for 1 to 4 feet high of soil. On my homestead, I use either a 4-foot-square or 5-foot-square raised bed, constructed of wood, which is 16 inches high. There are also commercially available cages designed for growing potatoes vertically, but instead of spending your hard-earned money, I’m sure your off-grid homestead has materials available for constructing one.

2. The soil

Before planting, set aside enough soil to fill the container. For potatoes, a slightly acidic soil that drains well is ideal. I like to use a mix of peat moss, native soil, compost and vermiculite.

3. Planting

Fill the cage with 6 to 8 inches of soil. Plant the seed pieces 3 to 4 inches deep. Let the potatoes sprout and grow to a height of 8 inches or so. The photo above is from my 5-foot by 5-foot potato cage for this year, where I have Yukon Gem potatoes that have grown 6 to 8 inches high.

4. Fill up the Cage

Once the potato plants are about 8 inches tall, like in the photo above, it’s time to partially bury the plants. Take some of the soil you’ve set aside and gently bury the plants about a third of the way.

I just did that in my garden. The photo here shows the potato plants after they’ve been partially buried the first time.

Continue the process of letting the vines grow higher, and then partially burying them, until your cage is full. Take care not to ever bury the plants by more than one-third to a half, and make sure there is adequate moisture.

Experts predict that an EMP strike that wipes out electricity across the nation would ultimately lead to the demise of up to 90% of the population. However, this figure begs an important question: if we were able to live thousands of years without even the concept of electricity, why would we suddenly all die without it?

Tips for Maximizing Success

Successful potato growing begins by selecting the right cultivar for your climate, and growing vertically is no exception. Potatoes originated in the cooler high altitudes of South America, and thrived for centuries in the cool weather of northern Europe and Ireland. So if you live in an area where the summers get hot like I do, choose a variety that has been developed for heat resistance. These include Butterfinger, Defender and Yukon Gem types.

The reason caging works is that some varieties of potatoes will continue to form tubers from parts of the vine that have been recently buried. However, not all potatoes varieties are created equal — some excel at this and some don’t. So for growing vertically, consider those types listed above, as well as All Blue, Carola, Dark Red Norland, German Butterball, Yellow Finn and Fingerling potatoes.

Final Thoughts

Potatoes should be grown on every off-gridder’s garden. They give great yields, provide lots of needed carbohydrates for the hard-working family members, and store for months without electricity. If you’ve shied away from growing them because of traditional space requirements, try caging today.

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40 Bizarre Home Remedies Our Grandparents Taught Us That Actually Work

These days, it has become all too common for people to reach for a pill bottle or call the doctor anytime something goes wrong, or even for the smallest scrape. The simple, wacky home remedies of our grandparents, those weird concoctions formed from everyday household goods, are often mocked by today’s medical establishment. But surprisingly, the truth is that our grandparents actually knew a lot more about the world than we give them credit for, and many of these old-fashioned folk remedies actually work. Not just that, but many of them work better than the synthetic pharmaceuticals that so many people stuff their bodies with today.

Preparedness Hacks: Once a nuke is heading your way, you might think that there isn’t much left to do, but you would be wrong!

Because we will show you America’s natural nuclear bunkers that are also EMP proof. When the sirens start wailing, all you need to do is pick the closest one to your home, where you can take cover before it hits.

Here are 40 weird, wacky, but shockingly effective home remedies that still work today, and would make grandma proud.

1. Use Garlic and Olive Oil for Athlete’s Foot

Everyone knows about the many health benefits of garlic, but did you know that it can fix your athlete’s foot problem in a jiffy? Just mince some garlic cloves, mix them with natural olive oil, and then use bit of cotton to rub this mixture onto the affected area between the toes.

2. Potato Slices for Headaches

Headaches and/or migraines can ruin even the best day, but there is a weird natural solution that works: potato slices. Just cut a few slices from a raw potato, soak them in a very thin cloth, and apply them to your forehead or directly to the temples.

3. Ease Cuticle Infections with Vinegar

Done too much manicuring? Cuticles all torn up and infected? Make a glass of vinegar and warm water, then put your fingers in it for about 15 minutes. Repeat this procedure once a day or so until the infection fades away.

4. Use Vinegar to Cure Swimmer’s Ear

There’s nothing that ruins a good day at the beach like coming home with swimmer’s ear. But when your grandparents told you to drop some vinegar in your ears, they weren’t kidding. The acidic properties of vinegar can kill off that awful swimmer’s ear bacteria, leaving you feeling like yourself again. Just take out some white vinegar, dilute it with distilled water, and put three drops into the problematic ear, three times a day, until the problem fades.

5. Olive Oil for Eczema

Feeling itchy already? Eczema can make anyone grow crazy. But olive oil, which is full of antioxidants and often used as an ingredient in professional skin creams, isn’t just good for athlete’s foot: it can ease the symptoms of eczema as well. Simply rub some olive oil onto the eczema-affected areas of your skin, and it should help quite a bit. Here are 23 survival uses for honey that you didn’t knowabout.

6. Fix Hiccups with a Spoonful of Sugar

Yes, seriously. The legends are true. Don’t get too overzealous with it, because diabetes isn’t something to mess around with, but this old-fashioned trick will halt the hiccups in their tracks. The reason why is because the behavior we call “hiccups” are actually just spasms of your diaphragm, so having a spoon of dry sugar will throw off the nerve muscles and cure their agitation.

7. Get rid of warts with duct tape

It sounds crazy, but it works. Instead of going to all the work to get your warts frozen off, just covered them with duct tape. After cleaning a wart off, just apply a strip of the tape to the affected area, and then keep it there for three days. After that, remove, rub the wart area with a pumice stone, and then apply new tape.  Continue this process every three days until the wart goes the way of the dinosaurs.

8. Treat Acne with Coconut Oil

Coconut oil might seem like the cool new kid on the block, but it’s actually an old-timer that’s been around since the 1800s. In addition to many other uses, coconut oil is an effective treatment for acne, since its antibiotic properties prevent further breakouts. Just apply coconut oil to the skin, maybe mixing it with a little raw honey.

9. Have a Little Yogurt for That Bad Breath

Bad breath, officially known as halitosis, is a terrible thing to live with. But the cure for it is right there in your fridge: yogurt. At least two servings a day of this probiotic wonder, ideally a plain brand with no sugar, changes the landscape of your tongue so that it won’t breed any more the bad bacteria that produces that distinctive stink.

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10. Deal with bug bites by using toothpaste

Well, not technically the toothpaste itself, but rather, the peppermint oil inside the toothpaste: if you have the pure peppermint oil itself, that’s even more effective. Either way, applying peppermint oil to a bug bite—even if it’s just through dabbing on a little toothpaste – will immediately reduce the raw itchiness we all know too well.

11. Use Licorice to Eliminate Corns

Yes, licorice, everyone’s least favorite candy. But the one thing worse than licorice is having a corn on your toe. If you soak some licorice with oil, apply it all to the affected area, then wrap it tight under plastic wrap (and maybe a sock) for 6-8 hours—for instance, overnight—this will cause the licorice to soften the corn.

12. Ease Your Hangover with Apple Cider Vinegar

Drinking might be fun, but hangovers aren’t fun for anyone. But when you used to see grandpa downing a shot of apple cider vinegar after a night with his buddies, he knew what he was doing. Apple cider vinegar balances the pH levels in your stomach after a little too much alcohol throws it off. Just gulp down a teaspoon of this vinegar, or a small shot-glass. If you can’t take it straight, dilute it with some water. 

During a SHTF situation, pain could become an annoyance for some, but unbearable for others.

If doctors are scarce and medicine becomes even scarcer, this one little weed, found all over North America and similar to morphine, could be a saving grace.

13. Constipation with beets

The human body needs to eliminate waste, and when it gets all bunched up, major discomfort ensues. One home solution you may have heard from your grandparents was to eat some fresh-steamed beets, then drink the water they were steamed in. This should clear out your colon like magic. Just be warned that when you do go, your stools or urine may be bright red: nothing to worry about, just the natural dye of the beets.

14. Vodka for stinky feet

Having trouble with foot odor? Get some vodka. No, we’re not suggesting that you get drunk and avoid the problem. The key is that alcoholic is an antiseptic, which means it eliminates the fungus that causes foot odor, and dries your feet out. Just soak a thin cloth in some vodka, swipe your foot down, and feel the smell go away.

15. Mix Cumin, Honey, Cinnamon and Ginger for Diarrhea

A bad case of the runs can keep you up all night. Instead of taking drugs that will simply constipate you, thereby causing more stomach pains, a better natural remedy is to combine a teaspoon of cumin, and the same portion of honey, cinnamon, and ginger into a paste that you can drink.

16. Lemons for an Earache

Pain in the ears can be soothed by the application of freshly-squeezed lemons. Just squeeze a lemon onto a Q-tip, and delicately rub this just inside the ear to restore pH balance.

17. Stinging Nettle for Hair Loss

You can’t force hair to regrow once it’s already gone, but you can slow down the rate of hair loss through the use of stinging nettle, an herb often used for tea. Drinking stinging nettle tea a few times a day should help, and you can also massage stinging nettle itself in your scalp.

18. Cure Nausea with Olives

Whether it’s from motion sickness or an unpleasant sight, the familiar (but unpleasant) side effects associated with nausea can be cured by eating olives, due to the tannin inside them.

19. Potatoes for Spider Bites

If a spider managed to sink its teeth into you, ease the itching and swelling by shredding a potato, wrapping the pieces in cloth, and applying to the bite area. Note, this is a treatment for symptoms of a regular, non-deadly bite: if the bite comes from a more deadly spider, such as a black widow, seek immediate medical attention.

20. Raw Honey for Chapped Lips

Don’t ever waste your money on Chapstick again. Much has been said about the healing properties of raw, organic honey, but if your lips are chapped, you can simply apply honey to the affected area—rub it on, just as you would Chapstick—and it will do the job nicely, and taste better to boot. Just make sure the honey is both raw and organic.

21. Garlic for Allergies

For a more natural antihistamine when your nasal allergies act up, eat lots of garlic, whether it’s straight bulbs or slices on crackers. Garlic contains a lot of the antioxidant quercetin, which eases allergy symptoms. If there’s no garlic in the pantry, onions work as well.

22. Buttermilk and Ginger for Diarrhea

If you don’t have cumin on hand, another weird-but-effective home remedy for diarrhea is to mix half of a teaspoon of dry ginger into a cup of buttermilk, and drink it.

23. Treat Styes with Potatoes

If you haven’t noticed, potatoes are a lot more powerful than people realize. If you get a stye on your eye, just grate a potato, wrap the gratings in a cloth, and press to the affected area to ease inflammation.

24. Avoid Mosquitoes with Garlic

If you don’t want to get eaten alive with mosquitoes, enjoy a garlic-rich diet, because mosquitoes are totally repelled by garlic. For further protection, rub garlic oil on your skin.

25. Yams for Menopause

To up your dosage of vitamin A, lower your cholesterol, and add more antioxidants to your diet, start incorporating yams—real yams, not sweet potatoes—into your regular daily diet.

26. Apples Help the Bowels

Apples are high in pectin, a naturally occurring fiber that both bulks up and softens stools. This means that apples are an effective treatment for both diarrhea andconstipation. Just make sure to eat the skin too, which contains valuable ursolic acid.

27. Banana Peel for Poison Ivy

While bananas won’t prevent you from getting the allergic rash that 85% of the population contracts from touching poison ivy, they can help. Rub the inside of a banana peel against poison ivy rash for relief from the pain and itchiness.

28. Honey for Acid Reflux

As soon as the symptoms of acid reflux begin affecting you, swallow three spoons of honey, and it should help you achieve better digestion.

29. Blackstrap molasses for Constipation

If you suffer from frequent constipation, try injecting a little blackstrap molasses into your diet, whether as a coffee additive or an extra ingredient in cookies. This molasses should ease constipation, but be careful not to over-indulge, because too much molasses will increase constipation.

30. Pine Syrup for Sore Throats

You know what helps a sore throat? Pine needles. Yes, really. To make pine syrup, collect a cup of freshly-washed pine needles, and thoroughly blend them. Meanwhile, boil water, corn syrup, and a bit of salt, mix this with the needles, then steep for a few hours. Keep this syrup in the refrigerator for at least a month, then keep it on hand forever to treat sore throats.

31. DIY Cough Syrup

If you want to make a good cough syrup from the ingredients of your pantry, mix together ¼ teaspoon ground ginger, 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar, ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper, 1 tablespoon of honey, and a few spoons of water. Mix it all together, and have 1-3 teaspoons to ease coughing symptoms.

32. Garlic for toothache

Nothing will keep you up at night like a bad cavity or an exposed nerve. While garlic won’t cure the underlying issue, chewing on garlic at night, particularly chewing whole cloves in the affected area, will ease pain tremendously.

33. Put on Wet Socks to Treat a Cold

Hear us out for a minute. To treat the symptoms of a common cold, begin by soaking your feet in hot water for at least three minutes – or just taking a bath. Meanwhile, soak a pair of your socks in ice water. Put the socks on your feet, cover them up with a pair of wool socks, and then go to bed. As you sleep with these horribly cold feet, the blood vessels will constrict, pushing nutrients up into your body to push out the infection.

34. Fix Dry Skin

To soften dry skin, break down two bananas and mix them with a bit of honey. Apply this paste to the skin, let it sit for about 20 minutes, and then wash it off, and your skin should feel softer.

35. Teabags for Burns

Get a cool-temperature, wet teabag, of any tea, and place it directly on the burned area. This won’t fix the burn, but it will relieve the pain almost immediately.

36. Oil Pulling

This might have become a trend recently, but it’s actually an old practice that our grandparents learned from their grandparents. Basically, enhance your dental routine by taking a spoonful of coconut oil – though other oils work as well – and swishing it in your mouth for five minutes a day, specifically pulling it through the teeth, and then spit it out into the toilet. The oil will “pull” all of the toxins out of the mouth, allowing you to spit them out in one go. When used in addition to standard brushing and flossing, oil pulling will help digestion, reduce gingivitis, prevent receding gums, get rid of bad breath, strengthen teeth, and much, much more.

37. Help Eczema with an Oatmeal Bath

If the horrendous itchiness of eczema still has you down, you can hugely reduce the itchiness by following your grandmother’s old advice taking a bath of oatmeal. There’s a reason that so many lotions and pharmaceutical eczema treatments contain oatmeal as an ingredient: it really works! For a home solution, just make a bath for yourself, fill it with colloidal oatmeal, and then soak for a while.

38. Stop Your Snoring

Is your snoring annoying your wife or husband? Try drinking a glass of warm milk with a teaspoon of turmeric powder added to it before bed, and hear your partner’s relief.

39. Basil Leaves and Ginger for Fever

Fevers are the body’s way of pushing out an infection, but when it’s time to cut back on the heat, here’s a home solution. Crush some ginger and basil leaves together into  paste, then add a teaspoon of honey. Squeeze out the liquid, and then take a drink ever four hours or so.

40. Soak Golden Raisins in Gin for Arthritis

If there’s one thing that afflicted so many of our grandparents, it was the terrible swelling pains of arthritis. But they had a home remedy that still works today. Get some golden raisins, soak them in gin, and let it sit overnight until all of the gin has been soaked up. After this is done, eat about ten raisins a day. While this won’t fix the underlying problems of arthritis, it will greatly ease the symptoms.

20 Lost Recipes From The Pioneers: What They Cooked On Their Journey Westward

Pioneer life was not easy and the daily chores of managing a house where more than a full time occupation.

Cooking was a major part of each day. Early settlers butchered their own meat and made corned beef, sausage, smoked and dried meats. Large gardens yielded produce for canning, pickling and other preserves. Root cellars stored potatoes, carrots, and onions. Milk was separated into cream for butter and baking and milk for drinking. Breads, cakes and pies were of course all baked at home from scratch from whatever was available.

For the most part meals were informal and the food hearty. Nothing was wasted. Dried bread was made into bread pudding; a bone was turned into soup and extra milk was made into pudding or cheese. Often there was a shortage of some ingredient. As you will see from the recipes, many are based on very basic ingredients and several on how to make a meal with only a few ingredients. Recipes would not only be for food but also for perfume, home remedies, wine and soap making.

Preparedness Hacks: Once a nuke is heading your way, you might think that there isn’t much left to do, but you would be wrong!

Because we will show you America’s natural nuclear bunkers that are also EMP proof. When the sirens start wailing, all you need to do is pick the closest one to your home, where you can take cover before it hits.

Recipe books were not common and cooking was very much a passed down art or trial and error. It is interesting to read recipes from this period, as often they are vague and written with a few small hints that only the person who wrote them would understand.

Pioneer women who had to decide what few precious things to carry across the plains surely made one choice in common—their own individual collection of “receipts,” as recipes were then called. For them, these were reminders of a security left behind and a hope for the abundance of the future. In the interim, they simply did what they had to do to keep their families alive.

Many early memories of pioneer food concerned the frugality with which the Saints lived: “We lived on cornbread and molasses for the first winter.” “We could not get enough flour for bread … so we could only make it into a thin gruel which we called killy.” “Many times … lunch was dry bread … dipped in water and sprinkled with salt.” “These times we had nothing to waste; we had to make things last as long as we could.”

No doubt the “receipt” books were closed during these times, and efforts were given simply to finding food and making it go as far as possible.

But slowly, even out of this deprivation, recipes grew. The pioneer women learned to use any small pieces of leftover meat and poultry with such vegetables as they might have on hand—carrots, potatoes, corn, turnips, onions—to make a pie smothered with Mormon gravy.

Experts predict that an EMP strike that wipes out electricity across the nation would ultimately lead to the demise of up to 90% of the population. However, this figure begs an important question: if we were able to live thousands of years without even the concept of electricity, why would we suddenly all die without it?

20 Lost Recipes From The Pioneers

Side Pork and Mormon Gravy

Mormon gravy, common fare among the early settlers and apparently a creation of necessity expressly for the times, is still hearty and nourishing for many of this generation who like to make it with ground beef or frizzled ham or bacon and serve it over baked potatoes.

8 thick slices side pork (or thick-cut bacon strips)

4 tablespoons meat drippings

3 tablespoons flour

2 cups milk

Salt, pepper, paprika

Cook meat on both sides in heavy frying pan until crisp. Remove from pan and keep warm. Measure fat and return desired amount to skillet. Add flour and brown slightly. Remove from heat and add milk, stirring well to blend. Return to heat and cook and stir until mixture is thick and smooth. Season to taste. Serve with side pork on potatoes, biscuits, cornbread, or even pancakes.

Mud apples

This is a variation on a Native American cooking method.

You will need

4 large apples
A bucket of mud

Coat the apples with about an inch of mud on all sides, being sure that the mud is of a nice thick consistency. When the fire has burned long enough to make some coals, have your adult help you to scoop some of the coals to the side. Bury the apples in the coals, and leave them there for about 45 minutes. Scrape away the cooled coals. Knock the dry cooked mud off of the apples and discard the skins. Spoon up the sweet steamy pulp for a surprising treat.

Some groups of Native American people used a mud coating on their food as a sort of oven. The steam from the mud would keep fresh-caught fish moist, and as it dried and became clay-like, it protected the food from burning. When the mud was peeled off, it took a lot of the fish scales with it. A delicious instant meal.

Chuckwagon beans

This is a cattle trail recipe from the Midwest. Although this was originally done on the campfire, it might be best if you bow to modern convenience and do the cooking on a stove top.

You will need

A 16-ounce package of dry pinto beans
9 cups of water
Two large onions, peeled and chopped up
2 teaspoons of salt
½ teaspoon of oregano
½ teaspoon of garlic powder, or two cloves of sliced garlic
¼ teaspoon of pepper
1 tablespoon of brown sugar or molasses (add this last, and put in a little more if you like.)

Wash the beans and heat them along with 6 cups of water ’til they boil for five minutes, then turn the stove off. Let them sit for an hour. Add three more cups of water and boil it all again. Now add everything else, stir it up, and cook it for about an hour.

Cowpokes on the drive west had to settle for foods which were portable. That meant a basic menu of beans and lots of meat. For a treat, there was cornbread, biscuits, or a sweetened rice dish. Pinto beans (which are small and spotted when raw, like a pinto pony) seemed to be the favorite. When cooked, these beans swell up and turn a sort of pinkish white. They were first given to the settlers by the natives on the Mexican border.

When you eat beans with rice or corn, the two foods mix up inside your body to create an important type of protein which is like the protein in meat. (Your body is made largely of protein, and so you need to eat a lot of it.) That’s why the native Southwestern people were so healthy with a diet of mostly beans and corn and not much meat.(Here are 23 survival uses for honey that you didn’t know about.)

Baked pocket yams

These were “handy” during the winter months, and not particular to any one area of the country.

Take several sweet potatoes, individually wrap them in foil, and surround them on all sides with mounded hot coals. Occasionally turn the potatoes. Cook till the sweet steam pipes out of the foil (about 45 minutes). Poke into the potato with a clean sharpened twig to check for doneness (the center will be soft).

When the potatoes are done, DON’T EAT THEM YET. Let them cool a bit, then slip one into each pocket to be used as hand warmers. These will keep you comfortable while you chat around the campfire. Pioneer mothers used to send their children off with these in the winter months to keep their hands toasty on the long walk to school. Then the kids would eat them for lunch. When you eat yours, you might want to use a dish and slather them up with butter.

Spotted Pup

Take whatever amount needed
for hungry cowboys of fluffy, cooked rice.

Put in Dutch oven and cover with milk and well-beaten eggs.
Add a dash of salt.
Sweeten well with sugar.

Add raisins and a little nutmeg and vanilla.

Bake in slow oven until egg mixture is done and raisins are soft.

Jerky Gravy

Jerky, ground or chopped fine
Little Fat or Grease
Flour
Salt & pepper
Milk

Fry the jerky until done.
Remove meat from grease, and add flour.
Add milk, and salt & pepper. Cook gravy. Add meat to gravy.
The amount of each ingredient depends on how much gravy you want.

Lemon Pie

One cup of hot water
One tablespoonful of corn-starch
One cup of white sugar
One tablespoonful of butter
Juice and grated rind of one lemon

Cook for a few minutes; add one egg; bake with a top and bottom crust.
This makes one pie.

Cooked Cabbage Salad

1 Pint or more of chopped cooked cabbage

Add: 1 Egg well beaten
¼ Cup vinegar
1 Tsp butter
Dash of salt and pepper

Sweeten to suit taste. Simmer a few minutes and add ½ cup of thick fresh cream. Serve immediately.

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The best thing is that you’ll save money on you electric bill.

To build your own solar panel almost for free, you’ll need to watch this video

Winter Red Flannel Hash

A great way to use left over corned beef is to add a few new ingredients and create Red Flannel Hash. Who knows who came up with the beets, but it really is colorful, and sticks to the ribs.

1 ½ Cups chopped corned beef
1 ½ Cups chopped cooked beets
1 Medium onion, chopped
4 Cups chopped cooked potatoes

Chop ingredients separately, then mix together.
Heat all ingredients in a well- greased skillet,
slowly, loosen around the edges, and shake to prevent scorching.
After a nice crust forms on bottom, turn out on a warmed plate and serve.
If it seems a little dry add a little beef broth.
Try with a couple poached eggs, for a hearty meal.

Spiced Corn Beef

To 10 pounds of beef…
take 2 cups salt
2 cups molasses
2 tablespoonfuls saltpeter
1 tablespoonful ground pepper
1 tablespoonful cloves

Rub well into the beef.
Turn every day, and rub the mixture in.
Will be ready for use in 10 days.

1876 Cottage Cheese

Allow milk to form clabber.
Skim off cream once clabbered.
Set clabbered milk on very low heat and cut in 1 inch squares.
Place colander into clabber.
Dip off whey that rises into the colander.
When clabber becomes firm, rinse with cold water.

Squeeze liquid out and press into ball.
Crumble into bowl.
Mix curds with thick cream.

Mormon Johnnycake

Here is a form of cornbread used not only by the Mormon immigrants,
as the name indicates, but quite often by most of the immigrants traveling west.
Because of the inclusion of buttermilk, a source of fresh milk was a necessity.

2-cups of yellow cornmeal
½-cup of flour
1-teaspoon baking soda
1-teaspoon salt

Combine ingredients and mix in
2-cups of buttermilk and 2-tablespoons molasses.

Pour into a greased 9” pan and bake at 425 degrees for 20 minutes.
To get a lighter johnnycake include two beaten eggs
and 2 tablespoons melted butter.

Soda Biscuits

Take 1lb flour, and mix it with enough milk to make a stiff dough;
dissolve 1tsp carbonate of soda in a little milk;
add to dough with a teaspoon of salt.

Work it well together and roll out thin;
cut into round biscuits, and bake them in a moderate oven.
The yolk of an egg is sometimes added.

Vinegar Lemonade

Mix 1 to 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar into a 12 ounce glass of water.
Stir in 2 tablespoons of sugar to taste.

Note: The pioneers used vinegar for numerous reasons.
One reason was to add vitamin C to their diet.

Fried Apples

Fry 4 slices of bacon in a Dutch oven. Remove bacon.

Peel and slice 6 to 8 Granny Smith apples.

Put apples in Dutch oven with bacon grease,
cover and cook down the apples, but not to mush.

Serve topped with butter or cream and crumbled bacon.

They’re great for breakfast or desert!

Dutch Oven Trout

As soon as possible after catching your trout,
clean them and wipe the inside and outside of the trout
with a cloth wet with vinegar water.

Don’t put the trout in the water.
Roll the trout in a mixture of flour,
dry powdered milk,
cornmeal,
salt and pepper.

Heat deep fat in a Dutch oven and fry until crisp and golden brown.

Black Pudding

Here’s an old ranch recipe courtesy of Winkie Crigler, founder and curator of The Little House Museum in Greer, Arizona.

6 Eggs
1 Cup Sweet Milk
2 Cups Flour
1 Tsp Soda
1 Cup Sugar
1 Tsp Cinnamon
1 Cup Molasses

Mix well.  Pour into 1-pound can and steam for 2 to 3 hours by placing in kettle of boiling water.  Keep covered.

This is to be served with a vinegar sauce:
1 Cup Sugar
1 Tbsp  Butter
1 Tbsp Flour
2 Tbsp Vinegar
½ Tsp Nutmeg

Put in enough boiling water for amount of sauce wanted.
Add two slightly beaten eggs and cook stirring constantly to the desired consistency.

How To Fry Quick Doughnuts

The following recipe for doughnuts came from the March 17, 1885 Daily Missoulian.  Obviously, anyone making these doughnuts will want to find a substitute for fat as a cooking oil.

Put a frying kettle half full of fat over the fire to heat.  Shift together one pound of flour, one teaspoonful each of salt and bicarbonate of soda, and half a saltspoon full of grated nutmeg.

Beat half a pound of butter to a cream and add them to the flour.  Beat the yokes of two eggs to a cream, add them to the first-named ingredients, beat the whites to a stiff froth and reserve them.

Mix into the flour and sugar enough sour milk to make a soft dough and then quickly add the whites of the eggs.  Roll out the paste at once, shape and fry.

Kid Pie

If the kid (goat) is too fat to roast, cut it into pieces and make pies.  Make a sauce of cut up perejil (parsley) and put in the pies with a little sweet oil and place it in the oven.

A little before you take it out of the oven beat some eggs with vinegar or orange juice and put into the pie through the holes made in the crust for the steam to escape.

Then return pies to oven for enough time to repeat The Lord’s Prayer three times, then take the pies out and put them before the master of the house, cut it and give it to him.

Brown Gravy

The following is a farm recipe for gravy from the late 1880’s.

This gravy may be made in larger quantities, then kept in a stone jar and used as wanted.

Take 2 pounds of beef, and two small slices of lean bacon. Cut the meat into small pieces. Put into a stew-pan a piece of butter the size of an egg, and set over the fire.

Cut two large onions in thin slices. Put them in the butter and fry a light brown, then add the meat. Season with whole peppers.

Salt to taste. Add three cloves, and pour over one cupful of water.

Let it boil fifteen or twenty minutes, stirring it occasionally.

Then add two quarts of water, and simmer very gently for two hours.

Now strain, and when cold, remove all the fat.

To thicken this gravy, put in a stew pan a lump of butter a little larger than an egg, add two teaspoonfuls of flour, and stir until a light brown.

When cold, add it to the strained gravy, and boil up quickly. Serve very hot with the meats.

What Kind Of Supplies Did The Pioneers Take With Them?

The question is answered by the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center this way…

A variety of guidebooks, newspaper articles, and helpful tips in letters from friends or family who had already made the trip provided different lists about what and how much was essential to survive the five-month journey. The critical advice was to keep things as light as possible, and to take easily preserved staple foods. Supplies in each wagon generally had to be kept below 2,000 pounds total weight, and as the journey progressed and draft animals grew tired, many pioneers had to discard excess food and baggage. Items taken by nearly all wagon parties included flour, hard tack or crackers, bacon, sugar, coffee and tea, beans, rice, dried fruit, salt, pepper and saleratus (used for baking soda). Some also took whiskey or brandy, and medicines. Minimal cooking utensils included a cast iron skillet or spider, Dutch oven, reflector oven, coffee pot or tea kettle, and tin plates, cups, and knives, forks, spoons, matches, and crocks, canteens, buckets or water bags for liquids. A rifle, pistols, powder, lead, and shot were recommended for hunting game along the way, and for self-defense. Candles were used for lighting, as they were far less expensive and lighter than transporting oil, and several pounds of soap was included. Only two or three sets of practical, sturdy, and warm clothing of wool and linen had to last the wear and tear of the journey, and a small sewing kit for repairs was important. Basic tools such as a shovel, ax or hatchet, and tools to repair wagon equipment were essential. Bedding and tents completed the list of necessities. For most families, 1,600-1,800 pounds of their supplies would be food, leaving little space for other items. Although some people tried to include furniture, books, and treasured belongings, these were soon discarded. According to many accounts, the trail was littered with cast off trunks, bureaus, beds, clothing, excess food, and even cast iron stoves. Though prices and availability of goods varied from year to year, for most emigrants it cost a minimum of $600 to $800 to assemble a basic outfit of wagon, oxen, and supplies.

An article from the St. Joseph, Missouri Gazette dated March 19, 1847

The Pioneers discovered an amazing plant with properties similar to morphine. Find out how to prepare the best natural painkiller from a plant that grows in your backyard. Watch video below!

Here’s just a glimpse of what you’ll find in The Lost Ways:

From Ruff Simons, an old west history expert and former deputy, you’ll learn the techniques and methods used by the wise sheriffs from the frontiers to defend an entire village despite being outnumbered and outgunned by gangs of robbers and bandits, and how you can use their wisdom to defend your home against looters when you’ll be surrounded.

Native American ERIK BAINBRIDGE – who took part in the reconstruction of the native village of Kule Loklo in California, will show you how Native Americans build the subterranean roundhouse, an underground house that today will serve you as a storm shelter, a perfectly camouflaged hideout, or a bunker. It can easily shelter three to four families, so how will you feel if, when all hell breaks loose, you’ll be able to call all your loved ones and offer them guidance and shelter? Besides that, the subterranean roundhouse makes an awesome root cellar where you can keep all your food and water reserves year-round.

From Shannon Azares you’ll learn how sailors from the XVII century preserved water in their ships for months on end, even years and how you can use this method to preserve clean water for your family cost-free.

Mike Searson – who is a Firearm and Old West history expert – will show you what to do when there is no more ammo to be had, how people who wandered the West managed to hunt eight deer with six bullets, and why their supply of ammo never ran out. Remember the panic buying in the first half of 2013? That was nothing compared to what’s going to precede the collapse.

From Susan Morrow, an ex-science teacher and chemist, you’ll master “The Art of Poultice.” She says, “If you really explore the ingredients from which our forefathers made poultices, you’ll be totally surprised by the similarities with modern medicines.” Well…how would you feel in a crisis to be the only one from the group knowledgeable about this lost skill? When there are no more antibiotics, people will turn to you to save their ill children’s lives.

And believe it or not, this is not all…

Table Of Contents:

Making Your Own Beverages: Beer to Stronger Stuff
Ginger Beer: Making Soda the Old Fashioned Way
How North American Indians and Early Pioneers Made Pemmican
Spycraft: Military Correspondence During The 1700’s to 1900’s
Wild West Guns for SHTF and a Guide to Rolling Your Own Ammo
How Our Forefathers Built Their Sawmills, Grain Mills,and Stamping Mills
How Our Ancestors Made Herbal Poultice to Heal Their Wounds
What Our Ancestors Were Foraging For? or How to Wildcraft Your Table
How Our Ancestors Navigated Without Using a GPS System
How Our Forefathers Made Knives
How Our Forefathers Made Snow shoes for Survival
How North California Native Americans Built Their Semi-subterranean Roundhouses
Our Ancestors’Guide to Root Cellars
Good Old Fashioned Cooking on an Open Flame
Learning from Our Ancestors How to Preserve Water
Learning from Our Ancestors How to Take Care of Our Hygiene When There Isn’t Anything to Buy How and Why I Prefer to Make Soap with Modern Ingredients
Temporarily Installing a Wood-Burning Stove during Emergencies
Making Traditional and Survival Bark Bread…….
Trapping in Winter for Beaver and Muskrat Just like Our Forefathers Did
How to Make a Smokehouse and Smoke Fish
Survival Lessons From The Donner Party

Get your paperback copy HERE